Magnitude:

29

 Abs Mag:

37

 Beisel Rating:

4.98 (Class 5)

 Height:

23 feet

 Tallest Drop:

12 feet

 # of Drops:

4

 Type:

Tiered

 Stream:

Swift River

 Latitude:

44.7208

 Longitude:

70.6322

 Maps:

USGS Ellis Pond 7 1/2"

 

Aerial Photography

 Delormes:

18 C4

 

 

The largest drop in the formation, click to enlarge

A side view of the main falls, click to enlarge

The view upriver, click to enlarge

 

 

Byron , Oxford County, ME , USA

 

No Known Alternate Names

 

 

The largest drop in the formation

 

Details:

The Swift River descends in a few short tiers through the contorted bedrock of Coos Canyon. While not a top shelf waterfall draw on its own, the canyon is certainly interesting in a geological manner. Contrary to the information in Greg Parsons' & Kate Watson's book "New England Waterfalls", there ARE waterfalls and cascades here, despite their claims to the contrary in the entry for Swift River Falls. The fact that they missed them leads me to believe that they never actually visited this place. Hmmm...

 

Geology and Bedrock Structure:

 

History:

 

Photography Notes:

I visited the falls during foliage season in 2008. The combination of blue-gray rock, green moss, red, yellow, and orange foliage was a veritable cornucopia of colors and textures. A polarizer is necessary, and a tripod is always advised.

 

Directions:

From Rumford, take Route 17 north to Byron. The Coos Canyon is signed and has a large pullout on the right side of the road. While here, be sure to observe the contortions of the bedrock, it's a neat place.