This is one of the Best waterfalls in the Northeast

 Magnitude:

45

 Abs Mag:

57

 Beisel Rating:

1.85 (Class 2)

 Height:

64 feet

 Tallest Drop:

54 feet

 # of Drops:

2

 Type:

Tiered

 Stream:

Ellis River

 Latitude:

44.2446

 Longitude:

71.2526

 Maps:

USGS Stairs Mountain 7 1/2"

 

Aerial Photography

 Delormes:

44 C7

 

 

The main drop from the base, click to enlarge

The falls from the upper vantage point, click to enlarge

The 10' cascade above Glen Ellis Falls, click to enlarge

An old postcard image from the archive, click to enlarge

An old postcard image from the archive, click to enlarge

An old postcard image from the archive, click to enlarge

A postcard image from the archive, click to enlarge

An old postcard image from the archive, click to enlarge

An old postcard image from the archive (rightmost waterfall), click to enlarge

An old postcard image from the archive (rightmost waterfall), click to enlarge

 

 

Pinkhams Grant , Coos County, NH , USA

 

Also Known As:
Pitcher Falls (out of common usage)

 

 

The main drop from the base

 

Details:

Glen Ellis Falls has the combination of power and grace that many waterfalls in New England simply do not have. Even in times of low water, this waterfall has a lot of flow. There are three good waterfalls in Pinkham Notch: Thompson Falls, Crystal Cascade, and Glen Ellis Falls. In addition to these three main waterfalls, Raymond Cataract (between Tuckerman's Ravine and Huntington Ravine) is distantly visible from the parking lot of Wildcat Mountain Ski Area, Chudacoff Falls (on George's Gorge Trail), and the cascades in Tuckerman's Ravine and the Gulf of Slides. Glen Ellis Falls is the jewel of this valley. It has a designated parking lot, a trail leading under Route 16, some steep stone stairs, and a great view of a powerful waterfall 64 feet tall. There is a short waterfall just upstream from the main falls, and another just downstream, each being about 10' in height. In addition, immediately above the crest of the main drop is a hidden 10' plunge into a tight cleft in the rock. This is only visible if you do a rock scramble to the brink. I do this sort of thing all the time, but I don't recommend this course of action for others.

 

Geology and Bedrock Structure:

The falls drop over the headwall of an ancient glacial valley. The bedrock is the Rangeley Formation (quartzite and schist).

 

History:

 

Photography Notes:

If you try to shoot this waterfall in high water from the base, you're gonna get soaked. Spray can be a huge issue. The first time I visited the falls was in a period of high water. I peeked around the corner, felt massive amounts of spray and retreated. I wiped my camera, mentally composed my shot, and then peeked, out, setting my tripod down in the same motion. One snap at about 1/15th of a second. Anything beyond that would have had excessive water spotting on the lens. In periods of moderate to low water, shots from the base are fine, although you might have to jostle for position with other photographers and tourists. You will absolutely need your polarizer, and a warming filter will be handy as well. You'll want to shoot early or on overcast days as the sun tends to peek through the notch at the top of the falls and create a hotspot. A normal focal length, 50mm or so, will do the trick, although I prefer the versatility of a zoom.

 

Directions:

Glen Ellis Falls is accessed via a very well marked parking area on Route 16 in Pinkham Notch. There is a tunnel from the parking area under Route 16. Follow the trail. In order to access the base of the falls, you'll climb down a long series of stone stairs.